Paleo, petro, and whatever else seems interesting

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theslinkylizard:

Hey mom look no feets I’m a snake now! 🐍

(via tyrannosaurslair)

— 11 hours ago with 153 notes

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Wavellite - Avant mine, Garland Co., Arkansas

(Source: spiriferminerals.com)

— 1 day ago with 229 notes
wtfevolution:

"Hey, evolution, you seem like you’re feeling better. That’s a pretty red bug you’re making there.”
"Oh, thanks. It’s a flatid leaf bug."
"I like the shape. And that’s a lovely shade of red."
"I picked it myself."
"That’s a weird fuzzy branch it’s crawling on, though, huh?"
"What? No. Those are the babies."
"I’m sorry?"
"Babies. Dozens of creepy, squirmy, waxy, fringy babies.”
"… you are so weird.”
Source: Flickr / christophandre / licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (exposure adjusted from original)

wtfevolution:

"Hey, evolution, you seem like you’re feeling better. That’s a pretty red bug you’re making there.”

"Oh, thanks. It’s a flatid leaf bug."

"I like the shape. And that’s a lovely shade of red."

"I picked it myself."

"That’s a weird fuzzy branch it’s crawling on, though, huh?"

"What? No. Those are the babies."

"I’m sorry?"

"Babies. Dozens of creepy, squirmy, waxy, fringy babies.”

"… you are so weird.”

Source: Flickr / christophandre / licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (exposure adjusted from original)

— 1 day ago with 1076 notes
aurusallos:

rhamphotheca:

Hallucigenia:  Worm-like creature with legs and spikes finds its place in the evolutionary tree of life
via: University of Cambridge
One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found - a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with a group of modern animals for the first time.
The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.
The affinity of Hallucigenia and other contemporary ‘legged worms’, collectively known as lobopodians, has been very controversial, as a lack of clear characteristics linking them to each other or to modern animals has made it difficult to determine their evolutionary home…
(read more: PhysOrg)
illustration by Elyssa Rider

Hallucigenia is one of my favorite Cambrian finds. I’m glad it’s found its place in the tree of life!

aurusallos:

rhamphotheca:

Hallucigenia:  Worm-like creature with legs and spikes finds its place in the evolutionary tree of life

via: University of Cambridge

One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found - a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with a group of modern animals for the first time.

The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.

The affinity of Hallucigenia and other contemporary ‘legged worms’, collectively known as lobopodians, has been very controversial, as a lack of clear characteristics linking them to each other or to modern animals has made it difficult to determine their evolutionary home…

(read more: PhysOrg)

illustration by Elyssa Rider

Hallucigenia is one of my favorite Cambrian finds. I’m glad it’s found its place in the tree of life!

— 2 days ago with 262 notes
libutron:

Time Twist | ©Jason Chinn 
This amazing formation is part of the North Coyote Buttes - The Wave area, located on the Colorado Plateau, near the Utah and Arizona border in the United States.
The area is a gallery of gruesomely twisted sandstone, resembling deformed pillars, cones, mushrooms and other odd creations. Deposits of iron claim some of the responsibility for the unique blending of color twisted in the rock, creating a dramatic rainbow of pastel yellows, pinks and reds.
Reference: [1]

libutron:

Time Twist | ©Jason Chinn 

This amazing formation is part of the North Coyote Buttes - The Wave area, located on the Colorado Plateau, near the Utah and Arizona border in the United States.

The area is a gallery of gruesomely twisted sandstone, resembling deformed pillars, cones, mushrooms and other odd creations. Deposits of iron claim some of the responsibility for the unique blending of color twisted in the rock, creating a dramatic rainbow of pastel yellows, pinks and reds.

Reference: [1]

(via geologychronicles)

— 5 days ago with 286 notes

shrimposaurus:

I love the Cambrian Period <3 So i did gijinkas

(via dinodorks)

— 6 days ago with 193 notes