Paleo, petro, and whatever else seems interesting

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mucholderthen:

AMAZING DOPPLER RADAR IMAGE:FROM OUT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, MAYFLIES EMERGE TO MATE AND DIE
Via evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution Is True blog [July 22, 2014]
What you’re seeing is a Doppler radar loop from the Lacrosse, Wisconsin office of the National Weather Service.  
What the radar saw for 90 minutes was a massive mayfly emergence on June 23.
Probably the giant mayfly, Hexagenia limbata.

On Saturday evening, June 23 2012, a massive mayfly emergence occurred along the Mississippi River beginning just after 9 pm. By late evening, mayflies were swarming in La Crosse, La Crescent, and points up and down the river. While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season, this particular event was one of the best seen on radar yet. 
In the radar time lapse loop from 9 pm to just after 1030 pm, the yellows and oranges indicate a large magnitude of airborne mayflies. 

Go here to see another amazing radar loop showing part of this swarm of mayflies being carried off by the wind at altitudes as high as 3000 feet!
More information [as well as images] at the La Crosse National Weather Service site …

mucholderthen:

AMAZING DOPPLER RADAR IMAGE:
FROM OUT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, MAYFLIES EMERGE TO MATE AND DIE

Via evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne's Why Evolution Is True blog [July 22, 2014]

  • What you’re seeing is a Doppler radar loop from the Lacrosse, Wisconsin office of the National Weather Service.  
  • What the radar saw for 90 minutes was a massive mayfly emergence on June 23.
  • Probably the giant mayfly, Hexagenia limbata.

On Saturday evening, June 23 2012, a massive mayfly emergence occurred along the Mississippi River beginning just after 9 pm. By late evening, mayflies were swarming in La Crosse, La Crescent, and points up and down the river. While the emergence of mayflies from their river bottom mud dwelling can occur at various times through the warm season, this particular event was one of the best seen on radar yet.

In the radar time lapse loop from 9 pm to just after 1030 pm, the yellows and oranges indicate a large magnitude of airborne mayflies.

Go here to see another amazing radar loop showing part of this swarm of mayflies being carried off by the wind at altitudes as high as 3000 feet!

More information [as well as images] at the La Crosse National Weather Service site …

(via dino-sours)

— 2 days ago with 22 notes
ifuckingloveminerals:

Hematite
Egremont, West Cumberland Iron Field, Cumberland, Cumbria, England, UK

ifuckingloveminerals:

Hematite

Egremont, West Cumberland Iron Field, Cumberland, Cumbria, England, UK

— 2 days ago with 90 notes
fossilporn:

Fossil jewel beetle from the Eocene, found in the Messel Pit (Germany)

fossilporn:

Fossil jewel beetle from the Eocene, found in the Messel Pit (Germany)

(Source: Wikipedia)

— 2 days ago with 35 notes
fossilporn:

Xiphactinus (from Latin and Greek for “sword-ray”) is an extinct genus of large, 4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) long predatory marine bony fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous.

fossilporn:

Xiphactinus (from Latin and Greek for “sword-ray”) is an extinct genus of large, 4.5 to 6 m (15 to 20 feet) long predatory marine bony fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous.

(Source: Wikipedia)

— 2 days ago with 24 notes

dino-sours:

Know Your T. rex!

There are dozens of Tyrannosaurus skeletons on display around the world, but most are casts of a handful of specimens.

AMNH 5027

The first T. rex ever exhibited, and for most of the 20th century the only nearly complete specimen known. Look for a boxier skull, oversized legs borrowed from the T. rex holotype, feet based on Allosaurus, and filled-in fenestrae on older casts.

As Seen At: American Museum of Natural History, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Academy of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Natural History (skull), Peabody Museum of Natural History (skull)

The Nation’s T. rex - MOR 555

Discovered by rancher Kathy Wankel on Army Corps of Engineers land. Currently on loan to the Smithsonian. Look for longer, lankier legs, and an inaccurately reconstructed sloped snout on cast skulls.

As Seen At: Royal Ontario Museum, Museum of the Rockies, National Museum of Scotland, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, National Museum of Natural History (in 2019)

Stan – BHI 3033

By far the most duplicated and most exhibited dinosaur in the world. Look for excessively long teeth and a perforated jaw.

As Seen At: Black Hills Institute, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, National Museum of Natural History, Dinosaur Discovery Museum, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Manchester Museum, Tokyo National Museum of Natural Science, traveling exhibits

Sue – FMNH PR2081

Discovered by Susan Hendrickson and the subject of an ugly 3-year legal battle before being purchased by the Field Museum. The oldest and most complete T. rex known. Look for a longer snout and stubby cocker spaniel legs.

As Seen At: Field Museum of Natural History, Disney World Animal Kingdom, traveling exhibits

Jane – BMRP 2002.4.1

A juvenile Tyrannosaurus discovered in 2001. Look for a scrawny build, gracile legs and a narrow skull.

As Seen At: Burpee Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

— 3 days ago with 122 notes
"

I am struck occasionally, usually while snuggling the cat, with our faith in domestication.

The cat is a small, ferocious predator, twelve pounds of…well, flab and fur, frankly, in Athena’s case, but what muscle there is is strong all out of proportion to her size. I have watched three 150+ primates try and fail to subdue a ten pound cat, and consider it not at all unusual. The cat is as flexible as a snake and as strong as an ox. She has quite dainty looking teeth and claws, but there’s nothing dainty about their ability to flay flesh from bone.

If the cat and I were in a duel to the death, I would almost certainly win. I am 15+ times larger than she is, after all, and while my teeth and claws are pathetic, I have prehensile hands capable of doing terrible things. But if I had to go in naked, as the cat does, (and assuming the cat was aware that she was going to have to kill me, and not taking a nap in the corner) I can pretty much guarantee it would be a Pyhrric victory. I’d look like I’d gone ten rounds with a wolverine. I would need stitches. A lot of stitches. Possibly a glass eye. And antibiotics by the truckload. It’d be a mess, and there would even be a chance of an upset if the cat managed to go face-hugger on me.

And yet, despite the knowledge of the shocking amount of damage my small predator could inflict, it never occurs to me to worry. I pick the cat up and she tucks her head under my chin and purrs, canine teeth centimeters from my jugular, and despite the fact that I am carrying a ruthless carnivore in a position where she could, with great ease, remove me from the gene pool, I am thoroughly content with the world. Even knowing full well that cats are not even a truly domesticated animal, that Athena’s kin might best be described as “consistently tamed,” my greatest concern is that my black tank top is now coated in white cat hairs.

We have such faith in the process of domestication, despite the sheer unnaturalness of what’s happening. Small predators do not curl up on the chests of large primates and purr in the wild. And yet, every now and again, generally when my small predator is purring on the chest of this particular primate, I think How strange, how strange… that we’re doing this, and even stranger, that we both take it completely for granted, and find nothing unusual in such a completely unlikely alliance.

"
— 3 days ago with 7134 notes